Study Finds That Fungi Release Toxins Directly Into Air

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Study Finds That Fungi Release Toxins Directly Into Air

A recent study conducted by French researcher Jean-Denis Bailly and his colleagues has found that mycotoxins from mold can disperse into the air under normal conditions.

The researchers examined the mycotoxins produced by three types of fungi, and discovered that “this transfer to air requires air velocities that can be encountered in ‘real life conditions’ in buildings.”

These aerosolized mycotoxins pose a health risk for the occupants as they can be easily inhaled and can penetrate into the respiratory tract.

The researchers further noted that approximately twenty percent to forty percent of buildings in Northern Europe and North America have macroscopically visible fungal growth. Therefore, it is crucial that any risk assessment regarding fungal growth in buildings takes these findings into consideration.


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Over 100 LAPD Officers File Claims Over Mold, Other Unhealthy Conditions at Southeast Community Police Station

Over 100 Los Angeles Police Department officers have filed worker compensation claims reporting mold and other unhealthy conditions at the Southeast Community Police Station.

The officers alleged that the Police Station’s heating and air conditioning system vents are covered with black mold and bird feathers. They claimed that these unhealthy conditions are causing respiratory issues including asthma and sinus infections.

The Los Angeles Police Protective League (LAPPL) is demanding that the city administration takes immediate action to mitigate this problem.

LAPD spokesman Josh Rubenstein said in a written statement, “While we understand the mold spore levels do not pose a serious health risk, we are working with the Los Angeles General Services Department to remove it from the building… It is our priority to ensure that LAPD employees and the community feel safe in our stations.”